‘A Christmas Carol’ poll results

AChristmasCarol1951 2Thanks very much to all those who have been following my Dickens in December season this month – I hope all those celebrating have had a good Christmas, and would like to wish everyone all the best for 2013. I’ve enjoyed posting about Dickens and discussing films of his work with all those who have commented, even though, once the festivities kicked in, I haven’t quite kept  up my original intention to post every day!

Over the month, I’ve been running a poll in the sidebar asking people to vote for their favourite adaptation of A Christmas Carol. There is no doubt at all about the winner – the 1951 version starring Alastair Sim, originally entitled Scrooge in the UK and known as A Christmas Carol in the US. Out of 39 people who voted in the poll, 24 (nearly 62%) went for this version. I’m preparing a review of this great film at the moment – after finally managing to see it in black and white rather than in the horrible colorised versions favoured by TV – and will be posting it in the next couple of days to finish off the month.

The second most popular version in my poll was a long way behind Sim’s performance – Scrooge (1938) starring Reginald Owen, which got 4 votes ( just over 10%). A Christmas Carol (1984) starring George C Scott got just one vote less at 3 votes (nearly 8%)  – I haven’t seen this version as yet but aim to do so next year!

The modern version Scrooged (1988), starring Bill Murray, got 2 votes, while the musical version, Scrooge (1970), starring Albert Finney, the Patrick Stewart version, A Christmas Carol (1999) and the  animation starring Jim Carrey, A Christmas Carol (2009) got 1 vote each. The other versions I listed got no votes, but one person did vote for “a different version – or none of them, just the book!”

I was slightly saddened that the 1935 British Scrooge starring Seymour Hicks got no votes, since for my money this is an excellent adaptation which looks forward to the Sim portrayal. Maybe the problem is that not enough people have seen it – I’d say it is definitely worth looking out next time you feel like an older Carol. Anyway, thanks to all who took part in the poll and who have supported my Dickens season.

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6 thoughts on “‘A Christmas Carol’ poll results

    1. Judy Post author

      I haven’t seen that animated version, which I believe had Sim reprising the role of Scrooge, but will hope to catch up with it in the future, maybe next year. Thanks very much for the comment.

  1. silverscreenings

    I was surprised that the 1951 version received the most votes – I thought a more “obscure” version would have won. Although, having said that, it is the version I am most familiar with and like the most.

    I was the lone vote for the Jim Carrey/animated version. I saw it in the theatre, in 3D, and loved every second of it.

    Looking forward to your review of the 1951 movie. I agree – the colourized version is dreadful.

    Reply
    1. Judy Post author

      Silver, I saw the Jim Carrey version at the cinema in 3D too, and enjoyed it – it does get the look of the original illustrations well – though it wasn’t my favourite. I can’t believe just how bad the colourised version of the 1951 film is! Thank you.

  2. Sam Juliano

    Agreed Judy that the colorized verion is an abomination. In any case, it appears that the voters were traditional minded (I was!) and chose the version that for decades has been revered and has achived a cult-like veneration based on television viewings and a rightful nregard on Sim as the ultimate Scrooge. This has been a wonderful series, and one of MOVIE CLASSICS’ greatest moments ever.

    Reply
    1. Judy Post author

      Sam, in the UK all television showings of this unfortunately seem to be the colourised version – I can’t think why, since plenty of other films are shown in black and white. Very strange. Thanks very much for the support all through this series, and I’m hoping to do more themed postings in the future, as I enjoy really getting into a subject.

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