The Philadelphia Story (George Cukor, 1940)

Philadelphia Story 4This great comedy really is a film that has its wedding cake and eats it. James Stewart sums it all up beautifully in two caustic lines – on the one hand: “The prettiest sight in this fine, pretty world is the privileged class enjoying its privileges.” That’s certainly a big selling point for a movie set in an impossibly luxurious mansion on the eve of a grand wedding, amid a whirl of champagne and gowns by Adrian.  But, on the other hand, as Stewart snarls on the phone: “This is the Voice of Doom calling. Your days are numbered, to the seventh son of the seventh son.” The Philadelphia Story, one of the greatest of screwball comedies, celebrates the quirkiness of rich society families, as epitomised in Katharine Hepburn’s haughty, upper-crust heroine, Tracy Samantha Lord. But it also  suggests that their days are indeed numbered, and shows this American aristocrat having to change and bend with the times.

The opening scene is a brief silent drama which shows Tracy’s violent break-up with her husband, CK Dexter Haven (Cary Grant), as she contemptuously breaks his golf clubs and he retaliates by pushing her through a door, deciding against hitting her. From this dramatic break-up, it’s a case of going full circle and getting back to the point where the couple fall in love. Just as Tracy is about to marry a safe but boring businessman,  George Kittredge (John Howard), Dexter turns up at the eleventh hour and starts turning everything upside down. He brings in a reporter and photographer from a gossip magazine, Spy, (he has been blackmailed into doing so) and things are soon becoming more complicated, and comic, by the minute.  It turns out that the reporter, Macaulay/Mike Connor (Stewart) is really a poetic short story writer, and Tracy starts to fall under his spell, threatening her forthcoming marriage – while the rest of her eccentric family are busy causing their own brand of mayhem.

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Come Live with Me (Clarence Brown, 1941)

come live with me 3 James Stewart and Hedy Lamarr make an unusual romantic combination – especially when she is dressed in stunning gowns by Adrian and he is down to his last dime. However, this surprising pairing works well in the MGM romantic comedy Come Live with Me. This isn’t one of the greatest films in that genre and does have some flaws, while a few scenes clearly derive from more famous movies, but I still enjoyed it, largely because of the chemistry between the couple – plus a wonderful scene where Stewart recites Christopher Marlowe’s poem The Passionate Shepherd to His Love, which gave the film its title. (I’ve included a link to this clip at the end.) I actually saw this one a little while ago and should really have written about it sooner, but better late than never… and the posting is an excuse to post some lovely stills.

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Small Town Girl (1936)

I saw in the New Year with yet another 1930s William Wellman movie which isn’t available on DVD! After seeing this one twice, I can hardly believe that it hasn’t had an official release. It is a highly entertaining romantic comedy-drama and has close links with Wellman’s Oscar-winning A Star Is Born, released the following year. Both movies star Janet Gaynor in similar roles as a young girl desperate to escape from a stifling small-town existence – and there are certain similarities between Robert Taylor’s character in Small Town Girl and Fredric March’s famous role as Norman Maine, not least the fact that both characters are heavy drinkers. As if that wasn’t enough, this movie also features a scene-stealing support role from a very young James Stewart. Fortunately, Small Town Girl seems to be shown quite often on TCM in the US and at the moment it is also available for viewing on a very popular video streaming website.

The basic plot of this film sounds very cliched, about a couple of strangers who get married in haste on a drunken night out and then have time to repent at leisure – but end up falling in love instead. However, the movie itself is far quirkier, funnier and more bitter-sweet than this plot description might suggest. According to the TCM website, Wellman was only brought in on the project by MGM quite late on and wasn’t very happy about making the film, asking to be replaced as director at one point. Their article also says he didn’t get on very well with Gaynor at first, because she was uneasy about his liking for slapstick-style scenes. However, as they went on to work together again so soon on A Star Is Born, with its wildly slapstick plate-smashing scene, presumably the two of them got over this and achieved a good working relationship.

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The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)

I didn’t particularly mean to watch this movie at all. As a Cecil B DeMille epic, it isn’t the sort of thing that normally appeals to me, since I tend to like movies which are on a smaller scale. But I noticed in the TV listings that James Stewart played a clown, which seemed like such surprising casting that I was tempted. So I turned it on as background viewing while doing some paperwork – and within a few minutes the paperwork was thrown to one side.

GreatestShow1

I suppose the initial attractions for me were the lavish costumes and the amazing Technicolor, which add up to a breathtaking mixture and make it hard to tear away your eyes from the screen. There is also masses of circus action – with the whole film almost seeming to be one long parade and series of stunts, and the human dramas just happening in snatched moments in between.

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It’s A Wonderful Life (1946)

A merry Christmas to anyone who reads this blog. Somehow, Frank Capra’s It’s A Wonderful Life had passed me by until my husband gave me the video last Christmas. I had seen the famous scene at the end where James Stewart runs down the street screaming “Merry Christmas!” – and the heart-stopping moment where he clears away the snow and sees his brother’s name on the tombstone – but that was about it.

James Stewart and Donna Reed

James Stewart and Donna Reed

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